Amendments: Bill of Rights

Friday September 28, 2012 – Periods 2,3, 6, 7

  Today we continued our lesson on the Constitution with the Bill of Rights. The Constitution might not have been ratified without the promise of a Bill of Rights, which was added in 1791. The first 10 amendments place strict limits on how the national government can use its power over the people. The First Amendment protects the freedoms of religion, speech, and the press, and the rights of assembly and to petition the government. The Second Amendment protects the rights of states to maintain a militia and of citizens to bear arms. The Third Amendment restricts quartering of troops in private homes. The Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments were written to ensure fair legal treatment for those accused of crimes. The Seventh Amendment concerns civil cases. The Eighth Amendment prohibits excessive bail or fines and forbids cruel or unusual punishment. The Ninth Amendment makes it clear that citizens have other rights beyond those listed in the Constitution. The Tenth Amendment states that any power not specifically given to the national government is reserved for the states.

Social Science Analysis: Frame Thesis

Thursday September 27, 2012

Periods 2 & 3

  Today we discussed and practiced the final SSA Frame component, the thesis statement. The standard measures if the writer communicates the purpose of the study throughout the research paper’s  analysis by establishing or reframing a question or thesis. An effective thesis cannot be answered with a simple “yes” or “no.” A thesis is not a topic; nor is it a fact; nor is it an opinion. A good thesis has two parts. It should tell what you plan to argue, and it should telegraph how you plan to argue that is, what particular support for your claim is going where in your essay.

Things to consider:
A thesis is never a question.
A thesis is never a list.
A thesis should never be vague, combative or confrontational.
An effective thesis has a definable, arguable claim.
A thesis should be as clear and specific as possible.

Periods 6 & 7

Today we worked on an activity to familiarize the students with the provisions of the Constitution, as well as how it embodies some basic governing principles and acts as the foundation for our government. Challenge 1 will acquaint the students with the rules and operations of the U.S. government as enumerated in the Constitution. They found answers to 20 questions directly in the Constitution or their class notes to guide them to the right article and section.

Constitutional Law

Wednesday September 26, 2012

Periods 2 & 3

  Today we worked on an activity to familiarize the students with the provisions of the Constitution, as well as how it embodies some basic governing principles and acts as the foundation for our government. Challenge 1 will acquaint the students with the rules and operations of the U.S. government as enumerated in the Constitution. They found answers to 20 questions directly in the Constitution or their class notes to guide them to the right article and section.

Periods 6 & 7

When delegates presented the draft of the Constitution, heated debates swept throughout the states. The Federalists, who supported ratification, led a highly organized campaign that promoted the benefits of a strong central government. Anti-Federalists opposed ratification because they believed that the Constitution endangered the independence of the states. While several states quickly gave their approval to the new government, other states voted for ratification only after Federalists promised to attach a bill of rights to the Constitution and an amendment that enhanced states’ powers. After much debate between Federalists and Anti-Federalists, the Constitution went into effect on June 21, 1788. The first session of Congress approved 12 amendments to the U.S. Constitution. The states ratified 10 of them in 1791, and these became known as the Bill of Rights.

Ratifying the Constitution

Tuesday September 25, 2012

Periods 2 & 3

  When delegates presented the draft of the Constitution, heated debates swept throughout the states. The Federalists, who supported ratification, led a highly organized campaign that promoted the benefits of a strong central government. Anti-Federalists opposed ratification because they believed that the Constitution endangered the independence of the states. While several states quickly gave their approval to the new government, other states voted for ratification only after Federalists promised to attach a bill of rights to the Constitution and an amendment that enhanced states’ powers. After much debate between Federalists and Anti-Federalists, the Constitution went into effect on June 21, 1788. The first session of Congress approved 12 amendments to the U.S. Constitution. The states ratified 10 of them in 1791, and these became known as the Bill of Rights.

Periods 6 & 7

The class completed their worksheet that looked at how the Constitution requires a simple majority for some actions and a supermajority for others. A simple majority means more than half, while supermajority requirements can involve a two-thirds majority or a three-quarters majority. Most elections in the United States require a plurality, or the most votes, but not necessarily a majority.

Constitution Majority and Supermajority

Monday September 24, 2012 – Periods 2, 3, 6, 7

  The Constitution requires a simple majority for some actions and a supermajority for others. A simple majority means more than half, while supermajority requirements can involve a two-thirds majority or a three-quarters majority. Most elections in the United States require a plurality, or the most votes, but not necessarily a majority.

Chapter 3 Quiz

Friday September 21, 2012 – Periods 2, 3, 6, 7

  Today students took the chapter 3 quiz. After the quiz, students completed their constitution worksheets they started yesterday or worked on organizing their notebooks for this week’s notebook check.

Constitution Articles and Sections

Thursday September 20, 2012 – Periods 2, 3, 6, 7

  Today students began work on a survey of the U.S. Constitution, beginning with the Preamble and continuing on through the seven articles of the Constitution. The completed worksheet is meant to be a thorough review of the various provisions of the Constitution, which provides the rules and operations of the U.S. government.